Mix it up

Admin change students' schedules two weeks into school

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Mix it up

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Shelby Hansen, Writer

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The beginning of the year is such a fragile time. New classes, new schedules and new friends are all included in the first few weeks of the back to school season. For some, it can be hard to adjust to a new year, and for others, it’s an exciting way to open up to new experiences. This year, however, many students were disappointed when their schedules were changed without warning two weeks into the school year. 

Fifth lunch had around 700 students enrolled in it while third only had 300. The principals decided to switch certain classes around in order to balance out the lunches. They found teachers that had a third period class and fifth period lunch, and they moved the entire class to third lunch. This also affected the teachers’ lunch as well. 

“It was as big a surprise to the teachers as it was to the students, except they knew about it first,” head counselor Becky Ludlow said. “I think it’s hard for the students to realize that even the teacher’s lunch changed. Students weren’t the only ones affected.”

Changing the lunches have affected some people in negative ways. For junior Mary Faith Fraire, it put two difficult classes back to back, causing her to get stressed out faster.

“I think I’m adjusting, but I am kind of sad that my schedule isn’t the way that I wanted it to be,” Fraire said. “I still don’t like that it’s back to back sciences because I have AP Psychology and then anatomy. I liked a break in between. I planned when to do my homework or get extra things done, I planned on doing it during fifth period, but now I don’t have fifth period lunch, so I can’t.”

This is not the first time that this situation has happened, though. The counselors move, open and close classes at the beginning of every school year, but it has never been on this large of a scale, and it typically does not affect seniors. 

“Seniors shouldn’t have to change their schedules,” senior Kayla Smith said. “And then they didn’t tell us that they were changing them. Yeah, they announced that they were going to move people, but they should’ve given specifics. Plus seniors should get the schedule they want.” 

As a positive, the schedule changes have offered ways to make new friends in new classes and balance out the lunches as well as classes. Many geometry classes and Pre-AP Precalculus classes now have less students and give the teachers more time to spend with students as individuals. 

“It definitely helped with lunches,” Ludlow said. “The sad byproduct is that students are upset about it and that it kind of disrupts their life a little bit for a little while until they get used to the new schedule. But the lunches are much more even now. It makes it easier to control all 450 kids at a time rather than 700.”